Adverbs of time

by Chmayzen EL.
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1. Introduction

Adverbs of time tell us when an action happened and how long, and how often. Adverbs of time are invariable. They are extremely common in English.

2. Adverbs that tell us when

Adverbs that tell us when are usually placed at the end of the sentence.

Examples

  • I’m going todo play football tomorrow.
  • I saw my friend today.
  • I will call you later.
  • I have to leave now.

3. Adverbs that tell us for how long

Adverbs that tell us for how long are also usually placed at the end of the sentence.

Examples

  • She stayed in city all day.
  • My father lived in Germany for a year.
  • I have been going to this school since 1996.

4. Adverbs that tell us how often

Adverbs that tell us how often express the frequency of an action in this case adverbs are usually placed before the main verb but after auxiliary verbs (such as be, have, may, & must)

Examples

  • He never drinks milk.
  • You must always take attention in the street.
  • I am seldom late.
  • she rarely lies.
  • I often eat vegetarian food.

5. Using Yet

We use yet as an adverb to refer to a time which starts in the past and continues up to the present. We use it mostly in negative statements or questions in the present perfect. It usually comes in end position:

Examples

  • Jack hasn’t registered for class yet.
  • I haven’t finished my breakfast yet.
  • Has she emailed you yet?
  • Have you finished your work yet?
  • No, not yet.

6. Using Still

We use still as an adverb to emphasise that something is continuing:

Examples

  • We’re still waiting for our new couch to be delivered.
  • She still goes to French classes every week
  • Jim might still want some.
  • Are you still here?
  • I am still hungry.

5630cookie-checkAdverbs of time

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